Six Nations 2012: Stuart Lancaster makes his pitch for permanent role

Interim England head coach Stuart Lancaster wants the role on a full-time basis when the Six Nations reaches its conclusion

stuart lancaster
Stuart Lancaster has led England to two victories and one defeat in the Six Nations The Sport Review

stuart lancaster

Interim England head coach Stuart Lancaster has no doubt he is the man to lead the nation in to a golden new era – even if there are others who still doubt his coaching prowess.

Lancaster is the current occupant of the Twickenham hot seat but the position is only an interim one for the duration of the Six Nations as the RFU decide whether to hand him the reins long term or appoint a
more stellar name to take England to the 2015 World Cup.

The 42-year-old has made it clear he has applied for the position full-time and will meet the RFU’s new chief executive Ian Ritchie to discuss the role before the Six Nations draw to a close on March 17.

But while Lancaster is certainly a contender there are plenty in the game who don’t think he has the relevant experience of coaching at the very top.

However the former England Saxons coach, who spent five years as the RFU head of elite player development, is adamant he has what it takes.

“There aren’t many people who have the ability to judge my coaching ability because there are very few people who have come with me on my coaching journey,” Lancaster told the Daily Mail.

“I would reckon I have spent 80 to 90 per cent of my time on coaching, whether it is 10 years as a teacher, five years as a coach, two as a director of rugby at Leeds and as Saxons coach. I’ve always been hands-on.

“Great leaders are forward thinkers and planners, they are honest, they are inspiring and they are technically proficient.

“They are the four things that make great leaders. There are a whole other range of competencies such as emotional intelligence and knowing when to put your arm around someone’s shoulder and knowing when to crack the whip. Relationship skills.

“That’s completely different to being a manager. A manager is a coordinator. Vision is one part of leadership, coaching is another, being democratic is another, being a pacesetter is another, creating close emotional bonds is another. Great leaders shift between them all and pick the right club out of the bag at the right time.”

© Sportsbeat 2012

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